Black Women and Confidence

Tori Sprott is one of Breaking the Glass Ceiling’s regular contributors. There is wide scope when discussing and dissecting women’s liberation. Whether it be academic, spiritual, emotional, sexual (and so forth), liberation is what you make it. One woman’s idea of liberation may differ from the next based on her life experiences, therefore it isn’t…

Why do the Labour Party only want male leaders?

Harriet Whitehead is a third year, Philosophy BA student. I am interested in politics and international affairs. More specifically in discussions surrounding freedom of speech and women’s rights. I hope to study this in the future. In over a hundred years of existence, the Labour Party has never elected a female leader. This is unlikely…

Myth v Reality: Child Marriages in Central Asia

Katarina Valieva is the Editor of Breaking The Glass Ceiling. The UNFPA defines child marriage as the “union of two persons, at least one of whom is under 18 years of age”. It is estimated that annually 15 million girls around the world marry before the age of 18. This article will examine the impact…

Chuskipop – Celebrating Desi Feminism

Antara Dasgupta is a 3rd year Chemistry student, an angsty intersectional feminist and a lover of history documentaries, bad reality TV shows and Reese’s peanut butter cups. Although there are a myriad of intersectional feminists who are fighting to dismantle the pillars of patriarchy, they seem to lack a certain brand of feminism that has…

Rape: The Greatest Weapon of War

We should be careful not to adopt the gender-biased assumptions of traditional IR theorists who systematically categorize women as the victims, and men as the perpetrators of state violence. Indeed, women can also be the perpetrators of state violence. The former Government Minister for Women and the Family, Pauline Nyiramasuhuko, has for example not only facilitated the massacre of Tutsis in the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, but has also ordered and directed rapes and killings with the final aim of wiping out the Tutsi population.

The Global War on Women’s Reproductive Rights

Written by Liza Kinnear, a Russian/Scottish third year law student.  Donald Trump’s rise to power in the United States, amongst other atrocious consequences, signifies a very real threat to women’s rights. I speak specifically of a woman’s right to control her own body and reproductive health. Only a few weeks into his presidency, it has…

Taiwan’s Separatist Movement: The fine line between Patriotism and Nationalism

Written by an anonymous contributor.  The ‘One China Policy’ has long been a point of contention. Yet few have overtly challenged the Asian superpower on its strategy towards Taiwan. While Beijing deems the island of Taiwan a breakaway province and nothing more, a significant portion of Taiwan’s residents aggressively reject this identity they’ve been assigned….

Two Case Studies on the Relationship Between Private Law and Gender Equality

Written by Nicolás Schuscheim, a third year Politics, Philosophy, and Law (LLB) student at King’s College London. His interests lie mainly in the interplay and intertwining relationship between the law and other aspects of society, such law and its hidden stereotypes against women, minorities, and developing countries. Unless you are thrilled by legal intricacies and…

The Misogynistic Undercurrents of Korean Political Protests

Written by Sydney Nam, a regular contributor. Sydney is a second year War Studies & History students, and her specific interests involve social injustice of ethnic-minorities (particularly in East-Asia) and about the violation of women’s rights in conflict-zones, such as South Sudan. A week ago, the world galvanized as a collective voice to speak out…

Women’s March London 2017

On Saturday 21st January 2017, citizens across the world mobilised in support of the women of Washington DC taking to the streets to make their voices heard against the biggest threat to their hard-won and inalienable rights.